scorecasting chapter summaries
Given this “go for it” attitude is statistically favorable for the average team I have to think it's doubly favorable for the Chargers and their abysmal special teams play. That being said, I learned quite a bit from the sections on Umpire bias in baseball, and the one covering golf from a conservative vs incautious approach, and the differences in success on shots. Jeremy Schaap, ESPN reporter, Author of Cinderella Man. You'd be correct. It was a very a very quick read, and I enjoyed the pace and the statistics and studies mixed into every chapter. I m not giving anything away because you ll want to read exactly how they arrived at their conclusions." All Right Reserved. Given this “go for it” attitude is statistically favorable for the average team I have to think it's doubly favorable for the Chargers and their abysmal special teams play. Take away the crowds and home advantage disappears. That figure is higher than the authors' figure of $130,000. A must read for all couch analysts." When a player hitting .299 gets a hit to push him over .300, he is much more likely to be taken out (or held out) of the lineup, to preserve the .300. Scorecasting will change the way you watch sports, but don t start reading it during a game; you re liable to get lost in it and miss the action. Striking research showing the immense complexity of ordinary thought and revealing the identities of the gatekeepers in our... by And I say that as a good thing. ... (Why, you might ask, don't *all* batters employ the same strategy of swinging wildly? That the decision of one NFL team, 20 years ago, to think outside the box changed the face of the NFL draft, forcing the other 29 teams eventually to follow. A rare combination of terrific storytelling and unconventional thinking.I love this book...", "The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won The authors take a "Freakanomics"-style approach to sports "truisms", debunking some myths (don't bother icing the kicker) and breaking others down (the real reasons behind home-field advantage). PSYCHOLOGY Think there is a home team bias? The pedestrian writing repeats itself innumerable times - to the point where I would almost recommend reading only every other paragraph (and maybe skipping the first and last sentences of those paragraphs). That might be true, but it would be nice to know how they figured it out and what they found. These promotions will be applied to this item: Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. If you love math (statistics) and sports (many are covered: football, hockey, baseball, basketball, etc) you will love this book. Richard Thaler, Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics, best-selling author of Nudge. Sports fans will enjoy this; so, too, will students of the human condition. by Crown Archetype. While the conclusions mostly summarize previous studies, it's hard not to stand on some shoulders in this genre. But, really, that isn't the case. Hardly groundbreaking, but a well-conceived and -executed addition to the burgeoning movement of stats-based sporting... by That is obviously an area I know more about then most of the rest of the book, but the issues there prompted me to be wary that their might be more in other sections I dont have as much knowledge on. “Inside the opponent’s 45-yard line, facing anything less than fourth and eight, teams are better off going for it than punting. A look at long-held sporting myths that are examined - and routinely dispelled - by cold, hard facts. 20SomethingReads reviews tend to be informal and conversational, with a brief but thorough plot synopsis and the reviewer's opinion weaved together into the review. When he gets a hit, he's the last batter because the game ends. Daniel Kahneman Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in. The two guys who wrote it are friends who grew up together—one an economist, one a sportswriter—and got back together just to write this book, and you can almost hear how much fun they had writing it.It's got the kind of information in it that would be a lot of fun to bring up in a discussion at a bar or while watching the game in your living room, though it might also be the kind of stuff that gets you beat up, so make sure you have a large friend with you if you bring these issues up in public.But regardless of how you use the info, make sure you read it. I’ve read a few books like this but this was the most entertaining – the writing style is light and breezy but the analyses seem fairly well done. 4 comments. Many interesting tidbits here, my favorite the fact teams are better off "going for it" on 4th down versus punting, which is something I’ve always thought. SPORTS & RECREATION. One thing that interested me in the chapter was this: "But no benchmark is more sacred than hitting .300 in a season. It didn't really affect me personally, but it did give me even more sporting knowledge and now I will have new perspectives when watching as much sports as I do. The data and resulting insights are fascinating in places, but the book is uneven and the high bar certain chapters and premises create, makes the unevenness of other chapter's more noticeable and disappointing. Quick and easy read. ), the resources below will generally offer Scorecasting The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of … and When Do Refs Choke The Most? Not always easy to read as there are lots of statistics and numbers but if you are patient and think your way through they make good arguments for such subjects as Does Defense Really Win Championships? "Scorecasting" treats these two paragraphs as two separate effects. I enjoyed the majority of the topics the authors delve into. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 23 July 2013. Still, I'd rather someone read this and at least start to look at things diffe. When he doesn't, he's not the last batter. Finally, the biggest issue I have with the notion that a hit is worth $200,000 is the fact that, were that true, then the average MLB salary would be $283,626,667! We are told, for instance, to “be conspicuous at all cost,” then told to “behave like others.” More seriously, Greene never really defines “power,” and he merely asserts, rather than offers evidence for, the Hobbesian world of all against all in which he insists we live. (PDFs: Old paper; new paper. Tom Scocca, at Slate. According to Pope and Simonsohn, in that final at-bat of the season, .299 hitters have hit almost .430. """The closest thing to Freakonomics I've seen since the original. January 25th 2011 PSYCHOLOGY The research seems thorough and the conclusions sound. You can read an excerpt -- almost the entire thing, actually -- at Deadspin, here.-----One thing that interested me in the chapter was this: "But no benchmark is more sacred than hitting .300 in a season. Maybe sometimes at fault for cunningly using data, Moskowitz and Wetheim made strong arguments about so many intriguing topics. Many interesting tidbits here, my favorite the fact teams are better off "going for it" on 4th down versus punting, which is something I’ve always thought. Therefore, it's not that they're more likely to get a hit in their last at-bat -- it's that their last at-bat is more likely to be one that results in a hit. by Tobias J. Moskowitz and L. Jon Wertheim. A scholarly read that is still fun. I love this book in theory, but, much like Freakonomics before it, the reality is disappointing. We’re glad you found a book that interests you. Anyone who has read Wages of Wins or follows Beyond the Box Score, Fangraphs or Adanced NFL Stats will be familar with most of the concepts and possibly read some of these topics previously. SCORECASTING by Tobias Moskowitz and L. Jon Wertheim may be the most thought-provoking sports book I have ever read. It's not just a baseball book, but there's no shortage of baseball in it. )The second point I wanted to make was a criticism of your comment accepting the idea that an MLB hit should be worth $200,000. Also includes sites with a short overview, synopsis, book report, or summary of Tobias Moskowitz’s Scorecasting The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won. Sites like SparkNotes with a Scorecasting The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won study guide or cliff notes. Their reliance on the work of others—not exactly standing on the shoulders of giants, as Newton once said in an uncharacteristically humble moment, but at least using peer-reviewed research—helps to lend credence to their claims in a way that doing their own work never could. Inside the opponent’s 33-yard line, they are better off going for it on anything less than fourth and 11. It's not just a numbers book, but it's got plenty of numbers. Still, I'd rather someone read this and at least start to look at things differently.

.

Alexander Milosevic Net Worth, Sims 4 Npc List, Zelda 2 Hammer, Gk5 Turbo Kit, Teaching Textbooks App, Eric Pierpoint Commercial, Waymo Stock Price Per Share,